GRANDCHILDREN

GRANDCHILDREN

♥ GRANDCHILDREN ♥

♥ GRANDCHILDREN ♥

REMARKABLE PEOPLE



FERNANDO PESSOA

(Lisboa, 1888 - 1935, Lisboa)


"Não sou nada.
Nunca serei nada.
Não posso querer ser nada.
À parte isso, tenho em mim todos os sonhos do mundo.


************
"I am nothing.
I will never be anything.
I cannot want to be anything.
Apart from that, I have in me all the dreams in the world."

or...

"I am not nothing.
I will never be nothing.
I cannot want to be nothing.
Apart from that, I have in me all the dreams in the world."


(Álvaro de Campos in "Tabacaria")




LISBOA - Chiado

LISBOA - Chiado
"Fernando Pessoa" by Lagoa Henriques. The place: "Café A Brasileira" (Brazilian Café) - 1905.

PLAYLIST TODAY




MUSIC IS THE PASSION REPORT



♥ ♥ ♥


GUITARS



Sep 10, 2016 - 06:13





ADAM LEVINE + PATRICK MONAHAN - PURPLE RAIN [PRINCE]



YouTube – "The Howard Stern Show"





ANN & NANCY WILSON (HEART) - STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN [LED ZEPPELIN]



YouTube – "The Kennedy Center"





PRINCE, TOM PETTY, STEVE WINWOOD, JEFF LYNNE, DHANI HARRISON & OTHERS - WHILE MY GUITAR GENTLY WEEPS [GEORGE HARRISON]



YouTube – "Rock & Roll Hall of Fame"





ERIC CLAPTON - RIVER OF TEARS



YouTube – "slunky08"





JEFF BUCKLEY - HALLELUJAH [LEONARD COHEN]



YouTube – " Danielle Katsav's Channel"





XUTOS & PONTAPÉS - HOMEM DO LEME



YouTube – "NoSa7"







_____________________


LEANING INTO THE AFTERNOONS by PABLO NERUDA

«Inclinado en las Tardes»



YouTube - "FourSeasons Productions"






CHANGING BATTERIES - OSCAR WINNING ANIMATED SHORT FILM



YouTube - "Bzzz Day"





DIALA BRISLY - A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG LADY

(a huge thanks to my daughter who e-mailed this video to me)



BBC Newsnight

«Syria is devastated by five years of war - and it's taken a huge toll on the country's children. Here's one woman - artist Diala Brisly - who is trying to make life that little bit more bearable for Syria's kids.»

Syria is devastated by five years of war - and it's taken a huge toll on the country's children. Here's one woman -...

Publicado por BBC Newsnight em Domingo, 20 de Março de 2016






A JOURNEY BACK TO ENDEARMENT

A JOURNEY BACK TO ENDEARMENT



FLYING A SECRET



I got here to hide. From equations and patterns. From repetition, after all.
Closed the door and got me a special place where I thought I could
somehow sit close to the stars. But I soon found out that the sky was
still opaque, no matter what the steps. And so I left. Again.

I thought, then, I could build me a different ceiling, a new-coloured scrap
of highness. And then make it work. Where I could dream, more than I sleep.
I have long decided that sleeping is overrated - that I know for sure. So I
take that time instead to travel the night alone and in the meantime I allow
myself to fly, unlike stated before... Yes, I like playing with paradox, to
expose the inside of words and the revelation of writing down the voice of a
silence. My adventurous, ever-walking silence.

So I came back. Here, within this quiet world, I intend to gather all my
things usually kept hidden or inactive. They are here to speak.

And since the future is a stand-by secret, I want to live by a precocious
clock, at every running instant of every entering second.

And I will not slow down until my "future exists now" - kind of reverse
quoting Jacob Bronowski.


Ana Vassalo
in my site "CAFEÍNA"(former "No Flying Allowed")
Nov 11, 2010 - 11:54



THE WALK OF TIME

THE WALK OF TIME

quinta-feira, 4 de agosto de 2016

ARISTIDES DE SOUSA MENDES - 'PORTUGAL'S SCHINDLER' (ABOUT CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE)




The Portuguese consul-general in Bordeaux
  during WW2 who saved over 30,000 lives.

 
 "It was actually my intention to save all those people"
 

Aristides de Sousa Mendes do Amaral e Abranches (July 19, 1885 – April 3, 1954) was a Portuguese consul during World War II.
As the Portuguese consul-general in the French city of Bordeaux, he defied the orders of António de Oliveira Salazar's Estado Novo regime, issuing visas and passports to an undetermined number of refugees fleeing Nazi Germany, including Jews. For this, Sousa Mendes was punished by the Salazar regime. Sousa Mendes was vindicated in 1988, more than a decade after the Carnation Revolution that toppled the Estado Novo.
For his efforts to save Jewish refugees, Sousa Mendes was recognized by Israel as one of the Righteous Among the Nations, the first diplomat to be so honored, in 1966.

___________

 

'Portugal's Schindler' Is Remembered, Decades After His Life-Saving Deeds


August 4, 2016  5:21 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition

     
 
ELEANOR BEARDSLEY

   

Those who were helped by Portugal's consul general, Aristides de Sousa Mendes, during World War II assemble outside the former Portuguese consulate in Bordeaux. Sousa Mendes issued 10,000 visas to Jews including Stephen Rozenfeld (center front, in blue), George Helft (center front, in white) and Lissy Jarvik (3rd from right), before being recalled and dismissed from the diplomatic service. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR


A group of about 50 people gathered in late June in the sunny courtyard of the Portuguese consulate in Bordeaux, France. It was from here in 1939 and 1940 that Portuguese diplomat Aristides de Sousa Mendes do Amaral e Abranches issued approximately 30,000 visas to Jews and other stateless refugees.

Lissy Jarvik, who lives today in California, was one of them.

"I was a recipient of a Sousa Mendes visa," she tells the group. "Otherwise I wouldn't be here. I would've no longer been alive 72 years ago."

Jarvik was just 16 when her Jewish family fled their home in the Netherlands in 1940. She's come back to France today with her two sons. They are part of a group, including visa recipients and their descendants, making a 10-day pilgrimage tracing the escape route taken through France, Spain and Portugal. It was from Portugal that they finally got out of Europe.

This group is also paying tribute to Sousa Mendes, the man who made their lives possible.
 

 
 Aristides de Sousa Mendes in 1940.
Courtesy of Sousa Mendes Foundation
 
 
While the heroic stories of others who saved Jews during World War II are better known — such as German industrialist Oskar Schindler, who saved Jews by employing them in his factory — the story of Sousa Mendes, who saved the lives of 10 times as many Jews as Schindler, has remained relatively unknown.

But that is changing.

Jarvik says she always assumed the Portuguese government had issued her family's visas to get out of France. Portugal was neutral during the war. But its Fascist dictator, Antonio de Oliveira Salazar, had actually issued orders banning Jews, Russians and stateless people from entering the country.

Sousa Mendes, his country's consul general in Bordeaux, knowingly disobeyed those orders, frantically signing visas day and night just before he was recalled to Lisbon in late June 1940.

At each stop along the way of this pilgrimage, covering a route including Bordeaux, Salamanca and Lisbon, people give testimonials. Some read old letters from late family members who escaped. But George Helft reaches back into his own memory. He was 6 when his family fled Paris, as the Nazis entered the city in June 1940.

"It's difficult for me to describe the roads then," he says. "But I remember them very, very well. They were filled with baby carriages, old cars with mattresses on the roof and six people inside. Thousands of people were walking, some with wheelbarrows, and of course everyone going south."

Helft's extended family got out of France and was able to reach New York. He only recently found out this was all because of Sousa Mendes.

Olivia Mattis, president of the Sousa Mendes Foundation, based in Huntington, N.Y., says it wasn't until 2011 that volunteers with the recently formed organization began to identify visa recipients. They were able to do so by comparing the names on a ledger from the Bordeaux Portuguese consulate, found in the mid-1990s, with ship passenger lists. While the ledger only gave the name of the head of the family, the ships listed every single passenger.








Retired U.S. newspaper editor Rebel Good (right) holds his Dutch-born mother's passport, showing the signature of Sousa Mendes. His mother never spoke about her escape from Europe. After her death, "I opened the passport up to the center, and the visa was there with Aristides de Sousa Mendes' signature on it," says Good. "It was a very moving and chilling moment." Eleanor Beardsley/NPR


Retired American newspaper editor Rebel Good remembers getting a call four years ago at his home in North Carolina.

"It was from someone who said he was with a foundation," says Good. "At first, I thought he was asking me for money. But he brought me up short by asking me pretty quickly if I were the son of Annelies Kaufmann."

Good says his late mother never talked about her escape from Europe. After the call, he dug out her old Dutch passport.

"And I opened the passport up to the center, and the visa was there with Aristides de Sousa Mendes' signature on it," says Good. "It was a very moving and chilling moment to see that connection just come forward."

Since 2011, nearly 4,000 visa recipients have been identified. Another is 82-year-old Stephen Rozenberg. When he was 5, he fled Lodz, Poland, with his family.


Stephen Rozenberg and daughter Leah Sills were among those gathered to honor Sousa Mendes' memory. Rozenberg holds a photograph showing him and his mother when he was five, when he and his family received Portuguese visas and fled France. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR
 

"We never knew what happened to our family when they got to Bordeaux," says Leah Sills, his daughter, who accompanied her father on the pilgrimage. "We never knew that part. And to find out that this one man sacrificed his own family and his own life for all these people is incredible."

When he was called back to Portugal in June 1940, Sousa Mendes was tried on 15 charges including violating Portugal's prohibition on visas for Jews and other stateless people. He was found guilty and dismissed from the diplomatic service. A father of 15, he was stripped of his pension and lived in poverty until his death in 1954. At his own urging, 11 of his children emigrated — some to countries in Africa and others to the U.S. and Canada.

Gerald Mendes, one of Sousa Mendes' many far-flung grandchildren, is also on the pilgrimage. He was born and grew up in Montreal. He says his grandfather was officially rehabilitated by the Portuguese government in 1988, and the family received an official apology from the president. The connections and stories pouring forth on this trip are important for his grandfather's legacy, he says.

"The story of each refugee is a new brick in the story of Sousa Mendes," he says. "But all these testimonies are especially important, because the story needs to be documented for the future to fight Holocaust deniers. Especially as survivors die out."

Many members of this group are struck by the parallel with what's happening with refugees around the world today. Visa recipient Helft ends his testimonial with a plea for acceptance.

"Forget about walls," he says. "Walls with Mexico, walls in Israel. Of course, accepting a flow of refugees, there are undesirables. How many? One percent? Think of all the others. Think of the children who are escaping horrors."


in        parallels MANY STORIES, ONE WORLD


http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/08/04/486735086/remembering-portugals-schindler


____________



Ana Vassalo
Aug 4, 2016

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